diaemyung:

therabbitprince:

posukkum:

Pray for South Korea

Tears are streaming down my face. I don’t care what your belief is, please send anything, even good vibes, to these kids because oh my god they are suffering so much. The water is muddy and it’s freezing and they are dying and they’re only seventeen.. 

These children are so scared.. desperately reassuring the world that yes, they are alive, please come for them. They’re messaging their little sisters, apologizing that they won’t be able to grant a request when they’re seconds away from death and just

oh.. oh my god. oh my fucking god words cannot describe the pain I’m feeling

I didn’t know what was going on. I knew it when I read BBC news. They’re still young.. We still have hope. I wish they’re fine..

(via keitoe)



professionalmagician:

professorcockblock:

friendly reminder that the day sirius slashes up the fat lady to breaks in to gryffindor tower and tear apart the dorms to find the passwords, it’s halloween

which means he spends the anniversary of his best friend’s death ripping apart the place they grew up together

Lemme just leave these here…

(via werewolf-husbando)



henrybearthebear:

ligaments:

does anyone else read the lips of people on gifs to figure out which part of the subtitles they are saying

And then get annoyed that they’re saying like 3 of the 20 words.

(Source: jonathan, via werewolf-husbando)


4 hours ago / 239,351 notes / © jonathan

theatlantic:

The Quiet Radicalism of All That

The ’90s were golden years for Nickelodeon. The children’s cable television network was home to now cult-classic shows like Are You Afraid of the Dark? (1991-2000), Clarissa Explains It All (1991-’94), The Secret Life of Alex Mack (1994-’98), and Salute Your Shorts (1991-’92)—arguably heretofore unmatched in their clever, un-condescending approach to entertaining young people. Nick News with Linda Ellerbee launched in 1992, and remains to this day one of the only shows on-air devoted to frank, engaging discussions of teen issues and opinions.
But perhaps the program that best embodied the values of Nick in those years was All That, a sketch-comedy show that premiered 20 years ago today. Created by Brian Robbins and Mike Tollin, All That ran for an impressive 10 seasons before it was canceled in 2005. The prolific franchise spawned a number of spin-offs (Good Burger, Kenan & Kel, The Amanda Show) and launched the careers of several comedy mainstays: Kenan Thompson, Amanda Bynes, Nick Cannon, and Taran Killam.
Like Saturday Night Live (which would later hire Thompson and Killam), All That was a communal pop-cultural touchstone. The parents of ’90s kids had the Church Lady, “more cowbell,” and Roseanne Roseannadanna; the kids themselves, though, had Pierre Escargot, “Vital Information,” and Repairman Man Man Man, and we recited their catch-phrases to one another in the cafeteria and on the playground. Although All That was clearly designed as a SNL, Jr., of sorts, it wasn’t merely starter sketch comedy—it was an admittedly daring venture for a children’s network to embark on.
In its own right, All That was a weirdly subversive little show. It never explicitly crossed the line into “mature” territory, but it constantly flirted with the limits of FCC-approved family-friendliness. Take, for instance, the “Ask Ashley” sketch. A barely tween-aged Amanda Bynes (Seasons Three to Six), played an adorably wide-eyed video advice-columnist. Ashley (“That’s me!”) would read painfully dimwitted letters from fans with clearly solvable problems. (Example: “Dear Ashley, I live in a two-story house and my room is upstairs. Every morning, when it’s time to go to school, I jump out the window. So far I’ve broken my leg 17 times. Do you have any helpful suggestions for me?”) She would wait a beat, smile sweetly into the camera, then fly into a manic rage; emitting a stream of G-rated curses, always tantalizingly on the verge of spitting a true obscenity into the mix.
Read more. [Image: Nickelodeon]

theatlantic:

The Quiet Radicalism of All That

The ’90s were golden years for Nickelodeon. The children’s cable television network was home to now cult-classic shows like Are You Afraid of the Dark? (1991-2000), Clarissa Explains It All (1991-’94), The Secret Life of Alex Mack (1994-’98), and Salute Your Shorts (1991-’92)—arguably heretofore unmatched in their clever, un-condescending approach to entertaining young people. Nick News with Linda Ellerbee launched in 1992, and remains to this day one of the only shows on-air devoted to frank, engaging discussions of teen issues and opinions.

But perhaps the program that best embodied the values of Nick in those years was All That, a sketch-comedy show that premiered 20 years ago today. Created by Brian Robbins and Mike Tollin, All That ran for an impressive 10 seasons before it was canceled in 2005. The prolific franchise spawned a number of spin-offs (Good Burger, Kenan & Kel, The Amanda Show) and launched the careers of several comedy mainstays: Kenan Thompson, Amanda Bynes, Nick Cannon, and Taran Killam.

Like Saturday Night Live (which would later hire Thompson and Killam), All That was a communal pop-cultural touchstone. The parents of ’90s kids had the Church Lady, “more cowbell,” and Roseanne Roseannadanna; the kids themselves, though, had Pierre Escargot, “Vital Information,” and Repairman Man Man Man, and we recited their catch-phrases to one another in the cafeteria and on the playground. Although All That was clearly designed as a SNL, Jr., of sorts, it wasn’t merely starter sketch comedy—it was an admittedly daring venture for a children’s network to embark on.

In its own right, All That was a weirdly subversive little show. It never explicitly crossed the line into “mature” territory, but it constantly flirted with the limits of FCC-approved family-friendliness. Take, for instance, the “Ask Ashley” sketch. A barely tween-aged Amanda Bynes (Seasons Three to Six), played an adorably wide-eyed video advice-columnist. Ashley (“That’s me!”) would read painfully dimwitted letters from fans with clearly solvable problems. (Example: “Dear Ashley, I live in a two-story house and my room is upstairs. Every morning, when it’s time to go to school, I jump out the window. So far I’ve broken my leg 17 times. Do you have any helpful suggestions for me?”) She would wait a beat, smile sweetly into the camera, then fly into a manic rage; emitting a stream of G-rated curses, always tantalizingly on the verge of spitting a true obscenity into the mix.

Read more. [Image: Nickelodeon]

(via werewolf-husbando)



Everything about Nine was great 

isashi-nigami:

Everything he said was pure gold

image

image

And not just the funny and sass…

image

Literally everything

image

Even when he don’t say anything, tho

image

image

image

I love how he was always smiling

image

Even tought he was the most damaged Doctor

image

The way he looked at Rose

image

GOD, THEY WERE SO CUTE

image hells yeah

Nine

image

I want him back

(Source: loki-no-cha-da-tardis, via awkwardturtlesss)



tom-sits-like-a-whore:

disneybombshell:

ifeelcapretty:

The American collegiate system in one gif set

it hurts

the saddest part is that this isn’t even really a joke

(Source: sandandglass, via awkwardturtlesss)


19 hours ago / 584,354 notes / © sandandglass
#eeyup

lx34e:

me and my friend arriving at an all you can eat buffet 

lx34e:

me and my friend arriving at an all you can eat buffet 

(Source: powerrangersvintage, via werewolf-husbando)


19 hours ago / 288,361 notes / © powerrangersvintage

ominousallure:

accurate representation of the last 4 years of my academic life

ominousallure:

accurate representation of the last 4 years of my academic life

(Source: matiasrod11, via fayjay)



drewgray:

orchid-ink:

iraffiruse:

Satisfying things

being a human is so weird

This feels so good to my brain

(via awkwardturtlesss)



candylandtimelord:

zeldaavianamerican:

John Barrowman at Phoenix Comicon 2013 {X}

I think he’s thought of this before

(Source: forsakensam, via awkwardturtlesss)



Pocky Pirate



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